Common mistakes with computer posture

We’re all given well-meaning advice about posture when it comes to sitting at computers. Most of it is either too vague or general to be of use of just plain wrong.

Take this article for example:
https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/wellbeing/2018/05/01/good-posture-practices/

It advises this for standing – ‘While standing, it is best to keep your shoulders back and aligned’.

It sounds like it means something but quickly doesn’t.  Shoulders back from where? From the front of your body or from your neck? How far back? Aligned with what? Is this a one time movement or do you need to keep repeating it? How much effort will it take?

Then there’s this one
https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/workplacehealth/Pages/Howtositcorrectly.aspx

This page give advice on ergonomics, the height of your screen, the position of your mouse.

Both sites give advice based on an outmoded idea of how our body works in practice.

In this idea, posture is static, positional and requires effort to maintain. Corrections are about getting good bio-mechanics or ergonomics.

They ignore our sensed, emotional and spiritual connections to our environment. If there is a disconnect in any of those it show up in your body as ‘bad’ posture.

So what is bad posture?
Bad posture is holding a position which is hard for your body to maintain easily for a period of time and believing that there is no other way of doing it.

Our bodies are flexible and adaptable. We can put ourselves into a wide variety of positions without a problem – even the infamous iposture or text neck position is fine. The problem is that iposture / text is difficult for our body to maintain for any length of time. Add the usual anxieties that most people bring to the act of using a computer and smart-phone and you’ve got a recipe for strain that could lead to injury.

So what is good posture at the computer?
Here’s my definition:
The ability to respond to the computer with balance, poise, ease, enjoyment no matter what pressure you’re under. It has physical components too. These are the relationship of your body to the surface you are resting on. The organization of your torso, particularly your head, spine and pelvis. The habits that pull out of this ease are multi-layered and includes your emotions, your mental focus and your sense of connectedness as well as your muscles and bones.

Here’s a definition from Pathways to a Centred Body by Donna Farhi and Leila Stuart

Structural Core Stability is defined as the ability to center your body in a clear relationship to ground, gravity, and space. Bringing awareness to the core structures of the body can assist in the synergistic activation of both primary and secondary core muscles. Your body is then able to organize itself around a fluidly stable and responsive core.

Here’s one tip that will begin to change your posture at a computer:
Connect backwards from the task on the screen you’re looking at to your body so that your task includes being aware of your body. It is this inclusiveness that will allow your work on a computer flow.

Want to find out more? Come along to my workshop on Computers, Smartphones, Yoga and the Alexander Technique on Saturday 9th June 2018, 10am to 1pm in London,UK.

Sign up to my free 5-part course on pain free shoulders

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© Kevin Saunders, Yogaground 2018

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