How asanas end up being difficult

At the end of a recent workshop, one of my students was doing Bakasana (child’s pose). It’s a pose done lying face down on the ground with your legs folded underneath you. I looked over and s
he didn’t look at all comfortable.

She said that she found it difficult and then tried a series of different self adjustments in rapid succession.
 I started to wonder about that. What was going on for her?

After asking some questions, it turned out that She expected it should be easy for her because when she went to a class, the teacher told the students to rest and relax in child’s pose. So, she had the idea that this should be easy for her and when it wasn’t she immediately started to think that there was something wrong.

What if, I asked, if she dropped the ‘should’ in her idea of the pose and just went with what it was? It started to help.

That’s the interesting thing about having a real body and doing yoga. Some poses are easy and manageable and some aren’t so much. Most people love child’s pose and find it soothing and restful. But not all.

We’re wired to frame at least some of our happiness about how we fit into a group. If you’re in a group and everyone seems to be enjoying child’s pose and you’re not, it’s all too easy to frame it as you not really belonging.

Once that thought takes root, then all sorts of difficult thoughts spin up about not being good enough, being the odd one out.

When I think about setting up a class where everyone can belong, I never frame that belonging on how well or not you are doing in the pose. I’m interested in using the pose to see what shows up. If it’s difficult, does the difficult you show up? Or can you be easy with what’s there? If it is easy, are you easy too or do you immediately switch off, go into a mind wandering state?

Then the asanas are tools we use to reveal the camouflage that hides our natural design. 

In so doing, we can find that the poses are actually simple and easy as long as we are willing to go at our own pace.

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© Kevin Saunders, Yogaground 2018

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